What does it mean to be sober curious?

The older I get, the less I’m inclined to drink alcohol. Whether it’s a social situation, a dinner with my husband or just an evening at home, I’ve been finding myself saying no to booze and yes to a clear mind and quality sleep.

The older I get, the less I’m inclined to drink alcohol. Whether it’s a social situation, a dinner with my husband or just an evening at home, I’ve been finding myself saying no to booze and yes to a clear mind and quality sleep.

I thought this was all just because I’m getting older and the hangovers feel much worse now. I used to be able to down a few brewskies, mixed drinks or glasses of wine without feeling much of anything the next morning. It’s a different story now. After just one glass of wine, the headache begins.

I thought I might be the only one feeling this way, as I still see many people my age—and older—enjoying adult beverages nearly every weekend.

But I also started noticing a trend online on many lifestyle blogs. Bloggers in their 20s, 30s and 40s started writing many pieces with titles along the lines of “I gave up alcohol for a month, and here’s what happened.” So I wasn’t the only one!

This made me want to research more on the topic. I found many articles and several books all about quitting booze, but not giving it up permanently.

I started reading “Sober Curious” by Ruby Warrington to see what this was all about. I’m halfway through the book, and I’m already blown away by Warrington’s insights.

She essentially says that alcohol is everywhere in our culture, and it’s basically a drug that’s accepted. She also mentions that most people are a little bit addicted to it. It makes sense. Many people start their weekend with Friday happy hour drinks and booze their way to Monday, with some social drinking events throughout the week.

But what exactly does it mean to be sober curious? In Warrington’s view, it means that you take a look at your life and change your drinking habits. You only drink when you want to and how much you want to. If it makes you feel ill, why would you want to drink often?

But being sober curious doesn’t mean completely giving up alcohol. If you’re not an alcoholic and can handle yourself around alcohol, then you should be allowed to partake in drinking it for special occasions. Think wedding toasts, significant birthday parties, special family traditions and the like. She sees it as more of a celebratory beverage rather than something to numb the pain of whatever hardships you may be dealing with in life.

Overall, it’s been an interesting read and has made me think about our culture. It also has made me realize how we can unintentionally ostracize people who don’t like to drink alcoholic beverages. It’s time to change that—and maybe I might join them every now and then.

Where to buy

The Repository
Select Rite Aid Stores
Spee-D Foods
Buehler's Fresh Foods
Fishers Foods, including 44th Street NW, Tuscarawas St. W, Fulton Drive, Lincoln Way E. and Cleveland Ave. NW locations
Aultman Hospital Gift Shop
Mercy Medical Center Gift Shop
Gervasi Vineyard Marketplace
Carpe Diem Coffee Shop, downtown Canton and Belden Village Mall locations
News Depot
Avenue Arts Marketplace
Yum Yum Tree Alliance
Grapes in a Glass