Life starts at 40: Glenda Lung’s secret to long life at 90

Glenda Lung turned 90 years old this year. She stays active, still drives and golfs a few times a week. But there has been pain in her life that really never goes away.

Glenda Lung turned 90 years old this year. She stays active, still drives and golfs a few times a week. But there has been pain in her life that really never goes away.

Q: What’s the secret to living a long,healthy life? I mean, you’ve been retired for almost 30 years.

A: My friends get mad at me because my calendar is always full. I think it’s important to have something to look forward to every day. I’m lucky. My mom lived to be 93. I guess it’s in my genes. I thank gosh for my friends. I have good friends and great family. I still golf, but I gave up some of the golfing this year. I’m not in a league. … I look at it as everything I do now is a bonus. I’m healthy. I thank God for my health every night. … I’ll tell you what, when they take my car away, that’s going to be the end of it. I love driving. My friends say I drive better than a lot of younger people.

Q: You experienced the death of a son in 1985. How difficult was that time, and did anything prepare you to get through that?

A: When my son was killed in ’85, that hurt. It just stung and hurt. I guess a little bit that helped during that time was my husband (Raymond) was shot down over Greece and he was missing in action for a while. He was a belly gunner in World War II and was shot down. We had a child just after he left for the war. I was working at Canton Drop Forge when they came and told me he was shot down and missing. I’ll never forget that day. I’m the type of person that I believe there is a reason. I always thought he would come home because we just had a little boy together.

At my age now, I try not to think about death. So I think the secret to having confidence is knowing there is a reason and believing in it.

Q: Are there any regrets you live with?

A: I try to live without having regrets. Some of the things I kind of regretted—I was a pistol at home, but from then on, I was a good kid. I remember when my mother got older, I took care of her during the daytime. I was a little smart aleck at times, and when you grow up, you try to make up for some of that. I loved my mom a lot.