It is difficult to define a day in the life of Michelle Hahn. She wears many hats, ranging from coach to teacher, to mother, wife, friend and daughter. Each of her tasks holds special meaning to her.

“Every day is different,” she said. “Right now I am in my summer vacation days, which means I am here at 7:20 (a.m.). We have conditioning until about 9:20 to 9:30. Then I am running over to Tam O’Shanter because my daughter plays golf.”

“Here” is GlenOak High School, where she teaches math and is a volleyball coach. Her math classes may be only during the school year, but her coaching is a yearlong commitment.

“We start at 7:30 (a.m.), get done at 3:15 (p.m.) with school, and I come over to the gym during volleyball season and am here until at least 6 p.m. for practice. If we have a game, depending on where it is, we don’t get home until between 9 and 11 p.m. My kids are already in bed. I grab something quick to eat, go to bed, and get up and do it all over the next day.”

She will be with her daughter until about 4 p.m., after which she will run over to one of her sons’ baseball practice from 5 to 6:30 p.m. They will get home for dinner around 7 p.m., eat, shower, maybe watch TV and then to bed.

“I have three children of my own, and they have four different schedules,” she said. “My daughter plays basketball and golf, and my two sons are on two different baseball teams, and I have volleyball. My husband coaches the baseball and football teams they are on, and I coach the basketball team my daughter is on and volleyball here.”

That is the typical summer day for Hahn.

When school is in session, she said, it is nothing to work a 12- to 16-hour day.

Day_Stretch“We start at 7:30 (a.m.), get done at 3:15 (p.m.) with school, and I come over to the gym during volleyball season and am here until at least 6 p.m. for practice. If we have a game, depending on where it is, we don’t get home until between 9 and 11 p.m. My kids are already in bed. I grab something quick to eat, go to bed, and get up and do it all over the next day.”

Games are Tuesdays, Thursdays and Saturdays. In addition, she teaches five math classes during the day—seventh-grade math and enriched seventh-grade math. She also teaches in the STEM community at Oakwood Middle School, and she teaches Problem Based Learning classes (PBL), which has an engineering aspect to it.

“That is the typical day in the classroom,” she said.

Hahn, a 1994 graduate of GlenOak High School, played varsity volleyball, basketball and softball for her alma mater, earning
11 out of 12 letters playing those sports. She played volleyball only three years.

“When I graduated, I was going to go play volleyball but realized the cost of education, and I really didn’t like being away from home, so I started coaching volleyball at the age of 19 on the middle-school level here,” she said. “At one point, before I had my children, I coached softball, basketball and volleyball here and teaching. I was doing all the freshman level for multiple years and teaching. I love coaching.”

She said it is a totally different perspective than the classroom.

“You get to see kids excel in something different other than academics,” she said. “It is very, very rewarding. You see a lot of growth going from point A to point B in a coaching year.”

Coaching, she said, is what got her hooked on teaching.

“I was an undecided major,” she said. “I wanted to be a lawyer, but when I started coaching to make money while I was in school, I fell in love with the progress from the beginning to end, watching the kids grow. It was really rewarding, so I decided to go into teaching.”

She just completed her 16th year.

About The Author

Denise Sautters
Contributor

“Speak your truth quietly and clearly; and listen to others, even the dull and ignorant; they too have their story.” I have carried these words from Desiderada close to my heart since I started working at The Repository more than 40 years ago. The same holds true with my work for About. All of us have a story to tell. I want to be the one to tell it.

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