You’re invited …

Setting the tone for one of the most important days of your life can be as simple as choosing the right invitation. Well, perhaps “simple” isn’t the right word, as the possibilities are seemingly endless. Nearly gone are the days when brides-to-be pored over giant books of invitations to place an order.

Setting the tone for one of the most important days of your life can be as simple as choosing the right invitation. Well, perhaps “simple” isn’t the right word, as the possibilities are seemingly endless. Nearly gone are the days when brides-to-be pored over giant books of invitations to place an order.

Those manufacturer books allowed couples to see and feel the stock invitations before ordering them.

Today, however, many local shops, such as David’s Bridal, Henry’s Cloud Nine and Abbott’s Bridal Shop, have removed the books in favor of online ordering.

But you still can find the books, if you look — Jim Cassler, president of Klingstedt Brothers Printing Co. in Canton says, “Yes, we still have large, old-fashioned wedding books!”

No matter how you order the invitations, there’s much to consider.

“The wedding invitation is the first tangible thing about your wedding the guests truly hold in their hands,” said Laura Woofter, an artist and owner of Paper Allure in Jackson Township. “In the custom (card) arena, we try to incorporate things about the bride and groom.”

Capturing the couple’s personality may mean using their photo, their words or their favorite design elements or colors on their invitation.

“Try to think of three adjectives or feelings you want people to get when they see it,” Woofter said, citing “romantic, eclectic and traditional” as examples.

Kimberly Lehman, a wedding consultant with Love, Laughter & Elegance Wedding & Event Planning, said one trend she is noticing is that many couples are doing their own invitations at home.

“They go with what’s in their budget,” she said, noting that a creative bride can use a kit from a scrapbook or stationery store to make her own statement.

Online tutorials are available to help with things such as pocket folds and other creative details, she said.

Wedding invitation trends in Northeast Ohio often follow what’s popular on the coasts and in bigger U.S. cities, according to Woofter. Invitations with pockets have been in style for several years, and are actually decreasing in popularity in big cities, she said. But, here, pockets are hot.

“People are intrigued by them,” Woofter said of the folderlike cards with pockets to hold response cards, a note from the couple, reception and accommodations information and directions.

Woofter said these types of cards can be expensive — sometimes up to three times the amount of traditional invites — to mail.

Any type of embellishment on invitations also is very popular with Woofter’s customers.

“Rhinestones are huge,” Woofter said.

Other examples are glitter designs, fabric, buttons, wood and dried flowers or leaves. On the envelope, she said, many couples are opting for a headline, such as “Let the celebration begin” or “Our happily ever after …”

Cassler said customers ordering from Klingstedt Brothers are looking for a more traditional look for their invitations, with simpler and less flamboyant designs.

Woofter noted that custom postage stamps also are big in the Stark County market right now. A photo of the couple with the date of the nuptials can be included on the stamp. It all “makes the guests hold onto that envelope,” Woofter said.

CHOOSING YOUR STYLE

Before sitting down with a consultant, it’s important to plan a budget, said Laura Woofter of Paper Allure in Jackson Township. Invitations can cost from $1.50 per piece to hundreds of dollars, and you will need a starting point.

“You can do amazing things on a budget,” she said. “But you have to prioritize.” To help your designer get ideas, start an inspiration board or keep a notebook of things that you want to incorporate into your wedding. Include pictures, thoughts and clippings from bridal magazines.

“It helps us take you down the path you want to go,” Woofter said.

Where to buy

The Repository
Select Rite Aid Stores
Spee-D Foods
Buehler's Fresh Foods
Fishers Foods, including 44th Street NW, Tuscarawas St. W, Fulton Drive, Lincoln Way E. and Cleveland Ave. NW locations
Aultman Hospital Gift Shop
Mercy Medical Center Gift Shop
Gervasi Vineyard Marketplace
Carpe Diem Coffee Shop, downtown Canton and Belden Village Mall locations
News Depot
Avenue Arts Marketplace
Yum Yum Tree Alliance
Grapes in a Glass