Crushing on Gervasi

Gervasi Vineyard and Italian Bistro unveils a new addition to its family this month: The Crush House & Winery. The $3.5-$4 million project, nestled in the rear of the 55-acre estate, houses a new winery, restaurant and wine bar.

New Crush House at Gervasi introduces new look, flavors and style

Gervasi Vineyard and Italian Bistro unveils a new addition to its family this month: The Crush House & Winery. The $3.5-$4 million project, nestled in the rear of the 55-acre estate, houses a new winery, restaurant and wine bar.

Get there by following the winding lane past the bistro to just beyond the one-lane bridge.

You won’t miss the stone-and-stucco edifice with architecture that mimics the other beautiful buildings on the property, including the adjacent Villa Grande. But the interior of the Crush House is far different from the Tuscan theme prevalent elsewhere on the estate.

“This is hip and industrial,” says Scott Swaldo, general manager of Gervasi.

Indeed. One step into the new place confirms it. A unique 58-foot serpentine bar winds throughout the open first-floor space, complete with soft, inviting red chairs that make you want to cozy up and settle in.

Seating here peers into the gleaming open kitchen and a computer-controlled wine dispensing system.

The open floor plan may easily make the Crush House the place to see — and be seen.

Gervasi owner Ted Swaldo likens the Crush House winery to a hightech factory, where winemaker Andrew Codispoti is capable of making 150,000 bottles of wine annually.

“Think of it as a factory that makes wine, and oh, by the way, you can have a meal here, too,” he said.

Guests can actually witness this for themselves, courtesy of peek-view windows into the winery, bottling room and barrel room from the second-floor staircase.

All of Gervasi’s wine production has moved to the Crush House, leaving room for additional seating in the main bistro. The design and decor conveys the sleek industrial theme with exposed steel, stained concrete floors, and distressed metal finishes.

The Crush House’s 160-seat wine bar and eatery offers a Napa-style experience, said Scott Swaldo.

“It will be a cafe by day, with light dinner foods, and a lounge setting at night,” he said.

Gervasi’s executive chef Jerry Risner will create and oversee a menu that includes mini pasta bowls, rustic sandwiches and “cicchetti,” or Italian-style tapas.

“It’s two-to-three-bite tastings that are paired with specific wines,” Swaldo explained.

Guests can find their comfort zone at the bar or pub tables on the first floor, or at cafe tables and soft seating on the second-floor, flower-bedecked balcony overlooking the property.

THE INSIDE SCOOP
Open Oct. 1

Casual Italian fare for lunch, a light dinner or later night snack, priced from $5-12.

Venetian-style Tasting Trios (cicchetti) — such as crispy fig crostatas, loaded Italian potato skins and creamy crab toast; paired with Malvasia Bianca wine.

Italian flatbread sandwiches (piada), including Tuscan chicken or steak Florentine.

Pastina bowls consisting of mini pasta with fresh toppings.

Soups and salads, such as a Tuscan kale and white bean soup.

Sweets include Nutella Rollatini, wine-infused sorbets and drowned gelatos (affogatos).

In addition to all of Gervasi’s wines, the Crush House offers some handcrafted signature cocktails made with OYO craft spirits from Columbus, along with some

Italian and local craft beers.

Hours: Monday-Thursday: 11 a.m.-10:30 p.m. Bar open until 11 p.m.; Friday-Saturday: 11 a.m.-12:30 a.m. Bar open until 1 a.m.; closed Sunday.