Welcome to the Haines House

It wasn’t even 30 years ago when passers-by could see the large copper roof from Perry Drive NW. The enormous house, across from Brookside Country Club, is hidden by the trees now. The 15,000-square-foot home may be Stark County’s most expensive, and exclusive, home.

It wasn’t even 30 years ago when passers-by could see the large copper roof from Perry Drive NW. The enormous house, across from Brookside Country Club, is hidden by the trees now. The 15,000-square-foot home may be Stark County’s most expensive, and exclusive, home.

It was built in Perry Township in 1987 by William Haines, who founded the Haines Criss-Cross Directory, for a price of about $6 million, according to Realtor Patty Carpenter. Now Carpenter is trying to sell the home.

Her aunt, Millie Small-Crowden and Millie’s husband, Grady Crowden, own the home now.

And you could be next.

The Crowdens bought it four years ago because they owned a similar-size home in Tampa Bay, Florida, and their 3,000-square-foot condo was too small back here in Stark County. Now the home is just too much.

They’re selling it for $1.79 million. Each of the five bedrooms has its own attached bathroom. There are two carved ivory and bone chessmen in the grand foyer, one of just seven sets in the world. The Haines family commissioned wood carvings from Russia that hang on the walls.

“When my aunt bought it in 2011, it was the largest real estate transaction in the county in four years,” Carpenter said.

All the woodwork and cabinetry is Amish custom made. The three-story spiral staircase is a sight to behold. Six furnaces heat the home in winter.

And outside is just as breathtaking as inside. There is a man-made lake, complete with a swan, Charlie; a boathouse; and a caretakers quarters that has an attached eight-car garage.

While there is a secured, gated entrance and the home is well-hidden by the trees now, wild turkey and deer roam the land near the home and lake.

Carpenter has shown the home to several interested parties, and one couple recently returned for a second walk-through. The land is large enough, and certainly so is the home, it could make a well-hidden bed and breakfast some day.