Little Flour Baking Co. | Behind the Food

In late September, Heather Reamy opened a little drive-up bakery on an alley in downtown Canton. Despite the offbeat location, Little Flour Baking Co. was an instant hit. On many days, Reamy sells out her entire inventory of muffins, scones, éclairs, cookies, danishes, brownies, cupcakes and other sweet temptations in an ever-rotating array of flavors.

In late September, Heather Reamy opened a little drive-up bakery on an alley in downtown Canton.

Despite the offbeat location, Little Flour Baking Co. was an instant hit. On many days, Reamy sells out her entire inventory of muffins, scones, éclairs, cookies, danishes, brownies, cupcakes and other sweet temptations in an ever-rotating array of flavors.

Reamy, 29, posts her menu each morning, Wednesday through Sunday, on the bakery’s Facebook page, and customers phone in their orders for curbside pickup on Rex Avenue between Third and Fourth Streets NE. A one-woman operation, Reamy does all her baking in the former Refuge of Hope kitchen.

Q. So how’s business?
A.
“It’s been crazy. The only thing I have left today are some muffins and two pieces of cheesecake. I see a lot of the same faces every week and sometimes a couple of times a week. Closing on Tuesday to be open on Sunday was a very wise decision. The first Sunday I was open, I completely sold out in 45 minutes.”

Q. What are your most popular items?
A.
“Definitely the danishes and the cinnamon rolls. A close third is the scones. People love scones. People typically buy an assortment box.”

Q. They probably eat something on the drive home!
A.
“I’ve had people send me photos of them eating a brownie in the car.” 

Q. What is your goal with the things you bake?
A.
“I’m very picky. I don’t like when things taste artificial and they lack luster. I want you to taste the ingredients. When you have a croissant or a danish, I want you to taste the butter. I want certain things to look upscale, like my chocolate dipped strawberries with gold flake, but I like other things to be rustic. I just made galettes, which are just pie crust with a filling. I’m constantly taste-testing—it’s a rough job.”

Q. Tell me bout your work day. 
A.
“I typically get here between 4 and 5 a.m., even on mornings when I don’t open until 9. I make everything from scratch, for better or worse. I have a huge danish order for tomorrow, 75 danish, so I’ll be working on that this evening.”

Q. Are you constantly experimenting with recipes and flavors?
A.
“For sure. I have a base recipe for everything I make—scones, cheesecake, muffins—and I just keep switching it up.” 

Q. Was it nerve-wracking opening your business during the middle of a pandemic?
A.
“My husband (Patrick) is a very supportive person. He reassured me that, ‘No matter what, it’s going to be OK.’ There’s no crazy loans or debt, which is a good thing. I wasn’t sure what the response would be for curbside. Some people want the full experience of coming into a bakery, and I get that. But it’s been great. It’s been pretty great, and I’m grateful. Not everybody has been so lucky.”