Emotional attachment strong to former T.K.Harris, Koontz home

For seven years, Ed and Judy Cebulko have owned what is still known by many as the T.K. Harris home in Hills and Dales. Stark County natives and Central Catholic graduates, the Cebulkos split their time between this home and a second residence in a suburb of Las Vegas. Ed is co-owner of Vegas Fastener Manufacturing and G2 Gaming in Las Vegas.

For seven years, Ed and Judy Cebulko have owned what is still known by many as the T.K. Harris home in Hills and Dales. Stark County natives and Central Catholic graduates, the Cebulkos split their time between this home and a second residence in a suburb of Las Vegas. Ed is co-owner of Vegas Fastener Manufacturing and G2 Gaming in Las Vegas.

Judy, who worked in real estate for 25 years, retired as an executive of the Howard Hughes Corp., where she completed her career overseeing 4 million square feet of commercial properties. She devotes her time to philanthropic projects, the most significant being the new Discovery Children’s Museum in Las Vegas, which will break ground soon.

But it’s here in Stark County where the Cebulkos roots began and where they often spend time and many holidays with a house full of family and friends.

The couple married in 1978 and have a 23-year-old daughter, Alexandra (“Lexie”).

Lifetimes of stories live in a home completed in 1930. The Cebulkos are the third owners of the home, after the Harris and Koontz families. The Cebulkos are fortunate to know some of their home’s stories because of local historians and family members of former owners who were willing to share their memories.

One such person is Dr. Jack Wynn, 88, of Jackson Township, a retired dentist who married the former Nancy Harris in 1949. Nancy Harris was the only daughter of T.K. Harris, the home’s original owner.

Wynn called the Cebulkos one day asking if he could bring his daughter over for a tour, as she had not seen the house since she was a little girl. They eagerly agreed, excited to learn more about their home’s past.

Wynn left behind an old photo album the couple used to replicate decorative elements.

In a phone interview, he talked about life in the house in the 1940s.

“Everything had to be perfection,” Wynn said of T.K. Harris, who developed the village and also owned Tam O’Shanter Golf Course. Dinners always were served by the staff in the formal dining room and had several courses. A dinner bell let the family know the was ready.

Constant attention was given to the gardens, with landscapers on site morning and night, he said. And he remembers that a chauffeur would drive Harris around the village looking for “any stone out of place.”

Wynn’s wedding reception was a 250-guest dinner party at the home, with dancing in the lowerlevel ballroom. He and Nancy raised two daughters. She passed away in 1998.