Downtown Magnolia

The village of Magnolia, situated in southeast Stark County, isn’t the largest downtown in the area, but a short walk around its quiet blocks reveals the town’s history.

The village of Magnolia, situated in southeast Stark County, isn’t the largest downtown in the area, but a short walk around its quiet blocks reveals the town’s history.

GEMS

Magnolia Flouring Mills

A red, five-story mill greets drivers traveling along North Main Street into Magnolia. The flouring mills, on the Sandy and Beaver Canal, used to produce goods that traveled along the waterway as far as New York and Louisiana. The Stark County Park District purchased the property in 2005, and it remains open to the public today. The office is a general store, and bags of cornmeal and animal feed are available for purchase. Inside the mill, signs explain to visitors the purpose of some of the equipment, such as the “time-saving alternative” one-man, hand-powered elevator. Visitors can call for a guided tour or show themselves around.

Bank of Magnolia

The Bank of Magnolia opened in 1899 as William H. Greer’s Sons. Renamed in 1910, the brick building sits on North Main Street next to a gazebo. The bank, which now has multiple locations, maintains records from the early 1900s and still uses the vault Diebold built.

A.R. Elson Home

Near the mill is the A.R. Elson Home. Elson, son of the founder of the village, assumed his father’s duties at the mill in 1857. The painted white-brick building has a wraparound porch filled with green chairs and covered by an awning. The house was built in 1879 and, according to the sign out front, is now available for weddings.

Richard Elson Homestead

Across the street from the Elson home is a marker designating the spot a historic Underground Railroad site. The former Richard Elson Homestead served as a safe haven for slaves. The sign says that Elson, founder of the village, became sympathetic to the slaves’ plight after traveling along the Ohio and Mississippi rivers to sell merchandise and seeing how they were treated in the South.

Sandy and Beaver Canal Days

The village’s annual August heritage festival has featured food stands, a parade, live entertainment, a car show, a pageant, a pie contest, a duck race, a 2-mile race and a fishing tournament.

Taggarts Ice Cream at the Isaac Miller Inn

If all your exploring leaves you hungry, you can stop for a bite to eat at Magnolia’s Taggarts Ice Cream, which opened at the inn in 2007. The building was a stagecoach inn during the 1800s, and the Magnolia Area Historical Society since has restored it. Inside, the ground floor is decorated with an early map of the village, along with portraits and relics from former businesses. As for the restaurant, Taggarts has a soda fountain counter and serves its famous Bittner—a frozen concoction of vanilla ice cream, hot fudge and roasted pecans—along with its variety of homemade ice cream flavors and soups, salads and sandwiches.

Where to buy

The Repository
Select Rite Aid Stores
Spee-D Foods
Buehler's Fresh Foods
Fishers Foods, including 44th Street NW, Tuscarawas St. W, Fulton Drive, Lincoln Way E. and Cleveland Ave. NW locations
Aultman Hospital Gift Shop
Mercy Medical Center Gift Shop
Gervasi Vineyard Marketplace
Carpe Diem Coffee Shop, downtown Canton and Belden Village Mall locations
News Depot
Avenue Arts Marketplace
Yum Yum Tree Alliance
Grapes in a Glass