On the bookshelf

Dr. Denise A. Seachrist, dean and chief administrative officer at Kent State University at Stark, answers our Q&A on books that have impacted her.

books_seachrist-head-shot

Dr. Denise A. Seachrist, dean and chief administrative officer at Kent State University at Stark, answers our Q&A on books that have impacted her.

 

 

 

books_splendidQ. What is the last book that made you cry?
A.
“A Thousand Splendid Suns,” by Khaled Hosseini (384 pages, 2007).

This is a heart-wrenching story of how women’s progress in education and employment in Afghanistan was crushed with the harsh laws imposed by the Taliban.

 

 

books_heidiQ. What is the first book you remember reading?
A.
“Heidi,” by Johanna Spyri (320 pages, 1881).

This was my first “big girl” book my mother brought home to me. I was in second grade, and I loved the story of the brave, young orphan girl overcoming her fears and challenges and changing others in the process.

 

books_hopeQ. What book got you interested in your career?
A.
”When Hope and Fear Collide: A Portrait of Today’s College Student,” by Arthur Levine and Jeannette S. Cureton (187 pages, 1998).

I’d been teaching at the university level for about six years when this book came out. I read it around the time I was making the transition into university administration in 2003.

After reading this book, I knew I wanted to be in a position to truly help students reach their potentials and fulfill their dreams.

books_harryQ. What is the last book you read?
A.
”Harry Potter and the Cursed Child—Parts One and Two,” by J.K. Rowling (320 pages, 2016).

As I said to my husband, “I have to keep up on my popular culture!”

Q. Who is your favorite author and why?
A.
Charles Dickens.

His social commentary and vivid details conveyed in such a florid and poetic writing style really appeal to me.

books_warQ. What is a classic you tell people you’ve read but really haven’t?
A.
“War and Peace,” by Leo Tolstoy (1,440 pages, 1869).

I know I’ve read (or skimmed) parts of this, but I don’t believe I’ve read the book cover to cover.

It’s over 1,000 pages, and arranged in books not chapters!