It’s more than an old house | On the Bookshelf

Vintage homes show details that are quintessential to an era, linked to the past. They are experienced in their existence, and harbor memories that can be re-created and relived with just a little — or sometimes a lot — of tender care.

Vintage homes show details that are quintessential to an era, linked to the past. They are experienced in their existence, and harbor memories that can be re-created and relived with just a little — or sometimes a lot — of tender care.

“The Find,“ by Stan Williams; photographs by Jim Franco (hardcover, Clarkson Potter/Publishers, 2009, 240 pages, $27.50). This book’s subtitle calls it “The Housing Works Book of Decorating with Thrift Shop Treasures, Flea Market Objects, and Vintage Details.” Treasures for home decorating are plentiful, “but how do you know a find when you find it?” asks the book’s publisher. On the pages of “The Find,” Williams and other “clever style makers” offer the answers.

“The Farmhouse: New Inspiration for the Classic American Home,” by Jean Rehkamp Larson (softcover, The Taunton Press, 2006, 217 pages, $21.95). “A farmhouse is intimately connected to the land and all its seasons,” the book’s publisher says. Collecting photos and text about 20 new and remodeled country homes, Larson celebrates the best of farmhouses of the present while tethering us to a simple rural past.

“All the Way Home (Building A Family In A Falling-Down House),” by David Giffels (softcover, HarperCollins, 2008, 314 pages, $14.99). Giffels searches Akron for a house in which he can raise his burgeoning family, the publisher of “All the Way Home” explains. “The quest ends at the front door of a beautiful but decaying Gilded Age mansion,” one that “lacks functional plumbing and electricity, leaks rain like a cartoon shack and is infested with all manner of wildlife.” The journey back is poignant and hilarious.

“Small Houses of the Twenties: The Sears, Roebuck 1926 House Catalog, an Unabridged Reprint,” Sears, Roebuck and Co. (softcover, Dover Publications, 1991, 146 pages, $14.95). In a “meticulous reproduction” of the rare Sears catalog, 300 photographs and drawings illustrate 86 different houses and cottages originally presented for sale in the period catalog. And text serves up interesting and informative facts about each of the “Honor Bilt Modern Homes.”

“Paula Deen’s Savannah Style,” by Paula Deen and Brandon Branch (hardcover; Simon & Schuster, 2010, 204 pages; $29.99). “Savannah became my ‘forever’ home when I moved here in 1987,” explains the author in her introduction. “The wonderful old buildings and timeless Southern traditions just clicked with me, and I’ve never wanted to leave.” In words and images, the “Queen of Southern Cuisine” shows you why.