Embrace the minimalist lifestyle and learn to tidy up with these reads.

“The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying Up: The Japanese Art of Decluttering and Organizing” by Marie Kondo.

Japanese cleaning consultant Marie Kondo takes tidying to a whole new level, promising that if you properly simplify and organize your home once, you’ll never have to do it again. Most methods advocate a room-by-room or little-by-little approach, which doom you to pick away at your piles of stuff forever. The KonMari Method, with its revolutionary category-by-category system, leads to lasting results. In fact, none of Kondo’s clients has lapsed (and she still has a three-month waiting list).

“Real Life Organizing: Clean and Clutter-Free in 15 Minutes a Day” by Cassandra Aartsen.

In her debut book, “Real Life Organizing,” Aarssen walks you through the steps you can take to create a beautiful, organized, clutter-free and almost self-cleaning home—a DIY Pinterest home. Simplify your life. You do not have to get rid of all of your things, you do not have to be a yoga-loving minimalist and you do not have to radically change your lifestyle or personality in order to simplify your life and have an organized home. The truth is that you do not need to actually be an organized person to live like an organized person.

“The Joy of Less, A Minimalist Living Guide: How to Declutter, Organize, and Simplify Your Life” by Francine Jay.

“The Joy of Less” is a fun, lighthearted guide to minimalist living. Part One provides an inspirational pep talk on the joys and rewards of paring down. Part Two presents the streamline method: 10 easy steps to rid your house of clutter. Part Three goes room by room, outlining specific ways to tackle each one. Part Four helps you trim your to-do list and free up your time and explains how saving space in your closets can save the planet.

“The Art of Discarding: How to Get Rid of Clutter and Find Joy” by Nagisa Tatsumi.

Practical and inspiring, The Art of Discarding (the book that originally inspired a young Marie Kondo to start cleaning up her closets) offers hands-on advice and easy-to-follow guidelines to help readers learn how to finally let go of stuff that is holding them back—as well as sage advice on acquiring less in the first place. Author Nagisa Tatsumi urges us to reflect on our attitude to possessing things and to have the courage and conviction to get rid of all the stuff we really don’t need, offering advice on how to tackle the things that pile up at home and take back control.

“The More of Less: Finding the Life You Want Under Everything You Own” by Joshua Becker.

While excess consumption leads to bigger houses, faster cars, fancier technology and cluttered homes, it never brings happiness. Rather, it results in a desire for more. It redirects our greatest passions to things that can never fulfill. And it distracts us from the very life we wish we were living.

“Goodbye, Things: the new Japanese minimalism” by Fumio Sasaki. 

Fumio Sasaki is not an enlightened minimalism expert or organizing guru like Marie Kondo—he’s just a regular guy who was stressed out and constantly comparing himself to others, until one day he decided to change his life by saying goodbye to everything he didn’t absolutely need. In “Goodbye, Things,” Sasaki modestly shares his personal minimalist experience, offering specific tips on the minimizing process and revealing how the new minimalist movement not only can transform your space but truly enrich your life.

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