Books of My Life: Rich Desrosiers

Rich Desrosiers has been executive editor of GateHouse Ohio Media for the past 20 months. He’s constantly reading something, from books, magazines and newspapers to cereal boxes and even an occasional owner’s manual. He likes recommendations.

Rich Desrosiers has been executive editor of GateHouse Ohio Media for the past 20 months.

He’s constantly reading something, from books, magazines and newspapers to cereal boxes and even an occasional owner’s manual.

He likes recommendations.

 

Q. What is the last book you read?
A.
“Start with WHY: How Great Leaders Inspire Everyone to Take Action,” by Simon Sinek (256 pages, 2011).

Most of us can explain the “what” and the “how” of our business lives, but it’s understanding “why”—our core motivations—that brings purpose to our jobs.

 

Q. What is the last book that made you cry?
A.
“The Last Campaign: Robert F. Kennedy and 82 Days That Inspired America,” by Thurston Clarke (336 pages, 2008).

Tears for the loss of seeing what America might have become, especially in race relations, had RFK won the White House in 1968.

 

 

Q. What book have you read that you think the movie is better?
A.
I deeply respect journalist Joe Galloway, his decades of dedication to our profession and the fact he was eyes on the ground in Vietnam, but I found his “We Were Soldiers Once … and Young: Ia Drang—The Battle That Changed the War in Vietnam” (432 pages, 1992) a bit of a slog. (Like the war itself.)

The movie, with Mel Gibson, Sam Elliott and Madeleine Stowe, was true enough to the book and much faster paced. Opt for the movie.

 

Q. What book have you read more than once?
A.
“Heaven and Hell: My Life in the Eagles (1974-2001),” by Don Felder (352 pages, 2008).

As an Eagles fan, I reread it after reading “Hotel California: The True-Life Adventures of Crosby, Stills, Nash, Young, Mitchell, Taylor, Browne, Ronstadt, Geffen, the Eagles, and Their Many Friends,” by Barney Hoskyns to compare the versions of events from the California music scene of the 1960s and 1970s.

 

Q. What is your go-to book recommendation?
A.
“Tattoos on the Heart: The Power of Boundless Compassion,” by Gregory Boyle (242 pages, 2011).

A Jesuit priest writes about living and working with gang members in Los Angeles. Real-life stories that swing from laugh-out-loud funny to deeply sorrow-filled and poignant. Life altering for me.

Where to buy

The Repository
Select Rite Aid Stores
Spee-D Foods
Buehler's Fresh Foods
Fishers Foods, including 44th Street NW, Tuscarawas St. W, Fulton Drive, Lincoln Way E. and Cleveland Ave. NW locations
Aultman Hospital Gift Shop
Mercy Medical Center Gift Shop
Gervasi Vineyard Marketplace
Carpe Diem Coffee Shop, downtown Canton and Belden Village Mall locations
News Depot
Avenue Arts Marketplace
Yum Yum Tree Alliance
Grapes in a Glass