Letter from the Editor: October 2015

When our health issue rolls around, I get excited. I find news stories on health matters to be rather fascinating. It’s interesting to find out what different diets and exercise can do for your body.

When our health issue rolls around, I get excited. I find news stories on health matters to be rather fascinating. It’s interesting to find out what different diets and exercise can do for your body. And juxtaposed to that, I like learning what’s bad for your body. I’m always the first to recommend health documentaries to friends and family.

After watching documentaries on health topics, I always want to clean up my diet and practice a healthier lifestyle. One documentary in particular that really changed the way I view diets is “Fat, Sick and Nearly Dead.”

In this documentary, Australian Joe Cross takes us along for his weight-loss journey across the United States. At the beginning of the film, he explains that he is suffering from a debilitating autoimmune disease and that he has reached his breaking point. He had tried medications and steroids, and he didn’t have success. His last resort was to completely change his diet. The 310-pound man went from eating full pizzas to drinking only juice for 60 days. While traveling across the country, he would make juice from fresh fruits and vegetables with a juicer in the back of his vehicle. He met people along the way and told them his story while offering them samples of his juices. Surprisingly, many people liked the juices.

As you can imagine, he lost weight during his travels. He also checked in with doctors to make sure he still was being healthy. His goal was to heal his body without medicine. I don’t want to give the ending away completely, but I will tell you that his life is healthier after the changes he made.

While this is an extreme case, it’s still worth learning from. Many health problems stem from obesity, and changing your diet could be the answer. But with any major health problem, it’s best to see your doctor before starting something new, such as an extreme diet or exercise regimen.

If you’re looking for ways to get fit or trying to find a new doctor, you’re in luck. This issue is full of both. Read all about the Top Docs in our area on Page 30. And don’t fall victim to foods that are billed as healthy but really are not. B.J. Lisko rounds up 10 sneaky foods posing as nutritious eats. You might be surprised what made the list. I know I was! I hate to admit that I have been tricked by half of the items on the list.

And I also have been duped by the premise of the BMI scale, believing that it was a true representation of health. For a better depiction of muscle mass, weight and height ratio to a person’s overall health, check out Alison Matas’ story about the BOD POD on Page 50.

Here’s to a healthier you! Until next month,
Kelsey Reinhart, editor

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