Letter from the Editor: Smile for the camera … | July 2012

“You’ve got Photoshop, right?” That’s often the first thing we hear when we begin a photo shoot for the magazine. Indeed, we all want to put our best foot forward — and doubly-so when you know your picture is going to show up in a full-color glossy magazine.

“You’ve got Photoshop, right?” That’s often the first thing we hear when we begin a photo shoot for the magazine. Indeed, we all want to put our best foot forward — and doubly-so when you know your picture is going to show up in a full-color glossy magazine.

It’s mostly in jest, an ice-breaker to take the edge off nerves that go along with getting your photo taken. But who doesn’t want to look 10 pounds lighter — or be rid of those dark under-eye circles — or fix countless other vanities.

Standing in front of the lights and camera can bring out those insecurities, especially when you don’t get to see your photo before it hits the newsstands, at which point it already has been printed in mass quantities for all to see.

Trust me, I get it. Just ask Julie Botos, our photographer, how bad it is to be tasked with the duty of taking my photo for this page every month. Ack.

I suppose the catch comes when we go from trying to look our best to trying to attain the unattainable.

That’s where our cover model contest winner comes in.

Meredith Carter is a 21-year-old recent college graduate who struggled with eating disorders and self-image issues throughout her youth. A college counselor finally helped her to see value in herself for who she was, a moment that changed everything for Meredith. She soon started her own organization, called Stealing Hollywood, that teaches young girls to believe in themselves, and realize that Hollywood’s standard of beauty is unattainable.

We were struck by Meredith’s powerful story and are thrilled to name her the winner of the 2012 Cover Model Contest.

Oh, and yes, we do have Photoshop.

Saying goodbye — and hello I can’t let this issue go by without saying a fond farewell to Kevin Kampman, the outgoing publisher of About magazine. This magazine was Kevin’s brainchild, and he has remained a steadfast champion of it throughout his tenure here.

With his support, About has been an overwhelming success in our community right from the start — and continues to grow and thrive with each issue. I’ll miss him and his vision but wish him great success in his new adventure.

Former general manager Chris White is the new publisher. Chris has also been a vocal supporter for About, and I am excited to see the magazine continue to grow and prosper under his tenure.

Blessings,
Darla A. Brown