Letter from the Editor: February 2017

I’m at the age that some of my friends are married, many are engaged or in a serious relationship, and some are still out there on the dating scene. Hearing from them and how their dating experiences were/are is a bit frightening to me.

VIRTUAL DATING IN THE 21ST CENTURY
I’m at the age that some of my friends are married, many are engaged or in a serious relationship, and some are still out there on the dating scene. Hearing from them and how their dating experiences were/are is a bit frightening to me.

We live in a world that is so connected—a little too connected, in my opinion. From the individuals who are in the very early stages of relationships to the couples who have been married for years, it seems that somehow technology is woven into all of their relationships now.

So many people have resorted to online dating because they can’t find a match out in public—maybe because they’re too glued to their devices to notice the sweet, intelligent prospect sitting beside them. Heck, so many people utilize online dating sites and apps that it’s no longer a stigma. It’s actually a very popular way to meet people. Just make sure you’re using the right sites and apps, or you could find yourself in a very uncomfortable situation.

If you’re lucky enough to find someone genuine this way, congrats to you. But think first before immediately posting about it on social media. Everyone will be curious about your new beau. Better make sure it’s a sure thing before you get others involved in your business. I know from experience. I was so embarrassed to change my status online from single to in a relationship back to single all in a few days’ time, and I even waited to go public with the exclusivity of my relationship. Looking back, I wish I never would’ve let others know.

And on that note, other people—social media friends—shouldn’t be updated when you and your lover go on a date every weekend. I know, it’s the time of sharing, liking, tweeting, tagging—but there’s a limit. Your fourth-grade classmate shouldn’t know your whole dating history. Your closest friends and confidants should be trusted with this information.

Maybe I’m just a bit old school, but I think your love life shouldn’t be common knowledge, at least not in the early stages. Give your relationship room to breathe and develop on its own without the pressure of social media and other people’s opinions. But if you’re an over-sharer by nature, just remember that other people will have opinions. Good luck out on the dating scene.

You’re note alone. Check out our 2017 class of Most Eligible Singles.

And if you’ve already found love, check out our feature on Fred Astaire Dance Studio. There’s nothing like dancing with your partner to rekindle the romance.

Until next month,
Kelsey Reinhart, editor