Letter from the Editor: With these choices, it’s hard to go wrong | August 2011

I’m hanging on for one more year. My youngest is about to begin her last year of preschool, so just one year left before all three of my children will be in school all day. Truth is, we could have pushed her. Her birthday falls right at the cutoff, so she’d technically be old enough this year for kindergarten.

I’m hanging on for one more year. My youngest is about to begin her last year of preschool, so just one year left before all three of my children will be in school all day. Truth is, we could have pushed her. Her birthday falls right at the cutoff, so she’d technically be old enough this year for kindergarten.

I’ll admit it, she’s my baby. I learned with my two boys — who are entering second and third grades this year — that changes come quickly once they start school, and that the expectations are high.

There are so many choices for parents, from when to send to them off to class to which school district to live in or which private school to attend.

For our back-to-school issue this year, we focus on the private schools in Stark County. We certainly aren’t at a loss for options. By our count, there are 26 private schools — Catholic, Christian and independent — to pick from right here in our backyard. We chose to highlight several of the schools in this issue.

Among those featured are Canton Country Day School, Stark’s only independent PK-8 school; Lake Center Christian School, the county’s largest, serving PK-12; Canton Montessori School, with a different philosophy on learning, for children PK-4; and each of the high schools, Central Catholic, Heritage Christian and St. Thomas Aquinas.

One thing is for sure, pride runs deep in each of the schools that we talked to. That doesn’t make parents’ choices any easier, but there’s a reassurance that you can’t make a bad one — even if you put it off for a year.

Easier to read

The Snapshots section — our most popular feature in the magazine — is filled with photos of local people at Stark County events each month.

For this issue, the section is overflowing with a whopping 17 pages — almost 100 pictures — submitted by readers. The pages might look slightly different to you this month. We’ve kept the black background that helps to set the pages apart from the rest of the magazine, but we’ve beefed up the size of the names.

A couple of readers have told me that the black background and thin white type can be a little tough on the eyes, so we tried putting the names in a bolder font to make it easier to read. Let me know what you think.

Blessings,
Darla A. Brown