Letter from the Editor: Ahh, the joys of homeownership | October 2010

There are times when a homeowner yearns to be a renter. I say that after reading the thank-you note we just received from our plumber. Yes, our plumber sent us a handwritten thank-you note.

There are times when a homeowner yearns to be a renter. I say that after reading the thank-you note we just received from our plumber. Yes, our plumber sent us a handwritten thank-you note. I guess having three major service calls in as many weeks (five total since we moved into our home last year) qualifies you for such perks. Good thing we signed up for the “frequent plumber” card.

The last time we called the plumber, a broken pipe from the upstairs master bathroom leaked down into the front entryway. So days before we were expecting nearly 100 people for a gathering at our home, we were left with a gaping hole in the ceiling just inside the front door. Where’s a landlord when you need him?

I started to think about our plumbing problems as I read Lisa Reicosky’s cover stories this month about vintage homes in Stark County. A broken pipe is one thing in a 14-year-old house like mine — it can be a different story entirely in a historic home.

I’m grateful for drywall and a handy father-in-law.

Ed and Judy Cebulko, owners of the 15,000-square-foot estate featured on our cover this month, were very gracious to share with us the fascinating history behind their 1930 Hills and Dales home.

Just the third owners of the home, the Cebulkos have worked to maintain it in a way that allows the historical and architectural integrity to shine through.

Often still referred to as the T.K. Harris home, theirs was the last of three homes built by the famed Hills and Dales developer.

The intricate detail throughout the home is stunning — in fact, Judy Cebulko told us that a single photo of the molding in the foyer staircase sold the couple on purchasing the home.

Also in this issue, local homeowners tell us what they love about their older homes — as well as some of the challenges they face in maintaining them.

Maybe I should mention to them that I know of a good plumber …

Blessings,
Darla A. Brown